Link: “The Weirdest Thing at Sochi? Your Face on a Giant Screen of Morphing Pistons”

“One of the most impressive spectacles visitors can find at the Sochi games this month doesn’t have anything to do with sports at all. It’s their own face, over 20 feet tall, rendered on a giant morphing wall at the entrance to Olympic Park.” Von Kyle VanHemert (@kvanhemert) > Weiter bei Wired

Link: Thomas Thwaites: How I built a toaster — from scratch [TED]

“It takes an entire civilization to build a toaster. Designer Thomas Thwaites found out the hard way, by attempting to build one from scratch: mining ore for steel, deriving plastic from oil … it’s frankly amazing he got as far as he got. A parable of our interconnected society, for designers and consumers alike.” Zum Video auf TED.com

Bruce Sterling talk on “vernacular video”

“Here’s a very stern and sardonic Bruce Sterling at the Vimeo Festival discussing “vernacular video.” Bruce notes, “This speech goes on for 56 minutes, practically forever by vernacular video standards.” Despite that, I was riveted by all 56 minutes’ worth — Bruce takes an unexpected turn through the history of the Dick Van Dyke show on the way to explaining how to predict the future and then wraps it up with a sinister turn around the morality of cigarette sponsorship and what it is that vernacular video does that runs parallel to selling coffin nails.” Via Cory Doctorow/Boing Boing

Neue Gegenwart-Autor Tobias Eberwein mit Medienethik-Preis META 2010 ausgezeichnet

Neue Gegenwart-Autor Tobias Eberwein ist mit dem Medienethik-Preis META 2010 der Hochschule der Medien ausgezeichnet worden. Er erhielt die Auszeichnung für seinen Beitrag „Raus aus der Selbstbeobachtungsfalle“ (erschienen in Neue Gegenwart Nr. 56). Alle Informationen finden Sie im Magazin

Chris Anderson: How web video powers global innovation

“TED’s Chris Anderson says the rise of web video is driving a worldwide phenomenon he calls Crowd Accelerated Innovation — a self-fueling cycle of learning that could be as significant as the invention of print. But to tap into its power, organizations will need to embrace radical openness. And for TED, it means the dawn of a whole new chapter …”

Weiter bei TED.com

Sir Ken Robinson: Bring on the learning revolution! (TED 2010)

“In this poignant, funny follow-up to his fabled 2006 talk, Sir Ken Robinson makes the case for a radical shift from standardized schools to personalized learning — creating conditions where kids’ natural talents can flourish.” Weiter zum Video